Australian Skybury Plantation Extra Fancy profile - thoughts?

greencoffee
roasting

#1

I’ve got my hands on a very interesting thing: coffee from the Skybury plantation in the Atherton Tablelands, Australia.

I’d like to do the expense justice, and make sure I bring out the best qualities in this bean as an espresso, but I’m unsure how to configure my roasting profile.

Despite being pure arabica beans, they are grown at very low altitude (just 540 - 600m), fully washed, and have very low acidity (according to the importer). They recommend a City+ roast.

Has anyone had experience with these beans, or can someone recommend or share a “safe” roasting profile to get started?


#2

Which arabica varietal?


#3

@nhsnielsen according to the farm’s website, it’s Bourbon…


#4

If I were in your situation, my starting point would be to find a Bourbon profile and see what happens. If grown at a low altitude, I would expect it to be a low density bean, so I would start with a filter profile to avoid the risk of over doing it.


#5

@nhsnielsen thank you very much for your ideas and input. This seems like a very sensible starting point!


#6

As a bit of a post script to this…

I’ve approached it from a few different angles (and learnt a whole lot about roasting low-altitude beans) and tried a range of roast profiles.

But ultimately, while there’s definitely been flavour variation, a dominant flavour of “chocolate ashtray” just won’t budge. Not pleasing in the cup at all.

I’m willing to keep experimenting, but I’m wondering if I’m expecting too much out of these relativity uncommon beans!


#7

How long are you resting the beans for? I have noticed I need to leave 4-5 days minimum after roasting for the flavour to develop properly. I always thought resting was just time to “degas”, turns out it is also to let the “roast” flavour to deminish.

Also, what temperature are you brewing at? I find with well developed roasts I need to significantly drop the temp, to reduce the “burnt” flavour in the cup.

Finally, I am still finding the Hoos approach is giving me a better framework to modulate flavour, removing the guess work, and reducing wastage.

Hope something in here helps :slight_smile:

Note: I only know espresso :smiley:


#8

Thanks @LS2498!

I’ve tried these beans at Day 2, 4, and now heading into the weekend, I’ll give them a chance for a few more days. I agree that they improve with rest, but the flavour profile isn’t changing terribly much.

As for temp, I’ve tried doing a few pourovers around 94C. I haven’t tried it as an espresso yet, but I’m willing to wait few more days to give that a go. My Rancilio doesn’t have a PID, so its a bit pot luck here.

I’m unfamiliar with the Hoos approach, but I’ll definitely take a look - thanks for your insights and ideas! Its incredible how technical this can become.