Guatemala Arabica decaf bean


#1

Hi iv got some Arabica decaf comes from Guatemala and is a regional blend. It is grown at an altitude of 1350 m. The coffee has a medium body, with acidity and fruity, caramel and citrus notes. These beans have been through a Swiss Water process for removing the caffeine. anyone know where to start to roast it iv only done the ikawa coffee so far?


#2

I would start from Ikawa Guatemala profile, extending the profile and trying multiple lengths by stopping manually (or alternatively creating multiple profiles of different length) … if you like the ikawa Guatemala of cause …
how much of it do you have? (How much do you want to experiment…)


#3

And may I suggest using Guatemala in the name of this thread? Arabica decaf is very generic so adding quatemala in front would make it easier to orient once we fill this part with tens of threads eventualy :wink:


#4

Iv tried that but looked over roasted stopped it after first crack not got any chaff of them either. Iv got 1kg of green beans had a little play but not there yet


#5

Don’t go by looks alone. Did you hear an cracks yet? See the expanse of the bean, usually during the expanse and first crack the beans start sounding like they are like brittle (?) I don’t know how to describe that sound but you’ll know it when you hear it. Also, taste a bean, chew on it. Is it hard? Brittle? taste like coffee (they beans taste remarkably close to what the cup is going to taste like. Limit to a small amount, I don’t eat more than 4 in a day, they pack a lot of caffeine.

We are all explorers in this vast tundra of the unknown. Any attempt is a good attempt and information can be gathered for the community. (if you’ve seen Hot Fuzz) the “greater good”.


#6

I’ve never roasted decaf but on the few times I’ve had some it always appears to be much darker than the caffeinated for the same roast level, so that what you are seeing is probably normal.

I’ve also found that after a very short period the decaf flavours seem to fall off a cliff. So maybe, small batches from the Ikawa may be ideal for decaf.
I have been thinking about getting some decaf to try, so I will follow with interest.


#7

Yes, I would definitely taste it first and not only judge from the looks. Also as Deven wrote, I use the chewing of selected (average looking) bean to have instant feedback … its not exactly the same as brewing it, but when I try to guess if I underdeveloped or if I went too far, I can get hints for both of these from tasting the bean. I do not eat it though, just chew, taste and spit it out … to minimize any negative effect that this practice might have.