Muninya Hill Kayanza, Burundi

burundi
ikawagreen
greencoffee

#1

IKAWA means coffee in Kirundi, the language of Burundi. The people in Burundi are highly dependent on coffee, and this was where the IKAWA concept was born.

This coffee was grown by the 735 coffee producing families who live on Muninya Hill in Kayanza. We are finding it rich, very sweet and with a very interesting acidity.

Have you enjoyed this coffee? How do you find the roast?


#2

This is probably my favourite coffee out of the 6 that came with the roaster. Having said that, I have enjoyed all of them. I think it is fairly unusual to get tamarind in a coffee and boy is it sweet! Not had a Burundi coffee before. I’ve been brewing it via V60 and Brewista smart dripper (aka Kalita 185)


#3

Hey @stephen.pickering21! This is one of my favourites as well - so densely sweet! It’s great to see the Burundi being well received with Burundi being the place that triggered the idea for IKAWA and the vision for the product (IKAWA means coffee in the language of Burundi!).
Out of curiosity, did you adjust the profile or were you happy with the IKAWA recommended roast?


#4

This was the first roast through the Ikawa, so I used the provided profile. Got tamarind, grapefruit and tons of sweetness. Up there with the best coffees I have tasted this year.

I did roast the Ethiopian Gugi (by mistake!) on the Burundi profile and it tastes great as well. Berries, cherries and plums and “natural” funk…


#5

It was my first roast too - and I like it a lot. But that is not a surprise, as I am keen on african coffee - loving ethiopian the most, but any good african coffee is on the top of my list.


#6

Have to agree with you there. I also have a predeliction for African coffee. My only disappointment in the collection is the lack of a Kenyan.


#7

Yes, Kenya would be great. But it will come, and I have had so much Kenyas lately, that i am quite fine with having two Ethiopias instead. But having some great natural and washed Kenya next time to have a simillar comparison, hmmm … that would be lovely…


#8

@pavel @stephen.pickering21 - great suggestion! I love Kenyan coffees as well. When I was at Detour Coffee in Canada it was always one of my favourite coffees to purchase. It was difficult to buy though - they are always some of the most expensive coffees to buy so you want them to be the best!


#9

I suspect there are many hidden gems to be found in many of the African nations less well known for speciality coffee at less exorbitant prices. I’ve had great coffees from Rwanda and Congo and Uganda this year.
I roasted a sample of the Burundi for someone whose opinions I respect. He took it to a local cafe well known in his area for speciality coffee where they brewed a large chemex and blind tasted it. The baristas were very impressed as were all who sampled it. Lasted 5 mins!
Great feedback. I’ve had a few ignorant comments from so called “experts”, who claim that the machine is no more than an expensive popcorn popper and cannot possibly deliver a well developed roast under 10 mins…


#10

Agreed - I think we’ll see some amazing coffees from Congo, Uganda and more in the specialty world soon.
In those situations I like to remind them that 2 of the top 6 baristas in the world this year used the IKAWA Pro Sample Roaster for their espresso which has just as much in common with a popcorn maker as the IKAWA At Home :wink:


#11

Just been tasting a roast based on the Kochere with points 3&4 raised, shared as “Dumerso 1” in another thread. Stopped at 6m15. 1C heard between (4.56 - 5.35). 50g, 28 hrs post roast.

Very different from the provided profile. Tastes very clean and juicy. Not as sweet but still sweet by any standard. Really puts the grapefruit acidity to the fore and pushes the tamarind down. Light body. Like a Nordic Kenyan roast. Not everyone’s taste of course…


#12

Sounds great, I’m going to try this today


#13

Day 2 brew delicious also. A tad sweeter and just a touch more tamarind body but juicy and quaffable.

Interesting to see what you think.


#14

Roasted another Burundi - Kirema from Kayanza in North Burundi elevation 1780 washed Red Bourbon using the Muninya Hill profile with excellent results.

Really liking these Burundi coffees. Hope you can source some more.