Where is the aroma of freshly roasted coffee?


#1

I have had an Ikawa home for a few months now. I’m really enjoying the the various brews I have had from home-roasted beans. I have even sourced some non-Ikawa green beans and roasted then using similar profiles from the limited selection on the App (I’m not yet feeling confident enough to start tweaking roast profiles or making my own).
The only (slight) disappointment I have is that my house never has that glorious smell of roasted coffee beans. The roast exhaust is definitely not that ‘coffee’ smell…and the cooled beans are not terribly aromatic either. I can smell the exhaust and taste the coffee so this is not a Covid symptom either.
So, how do I give my kitchen/house the wonderful coffee-shop (bean seller not hot drink supplier) smell? Do I need to roast darker than I have been (I didn’t get anything from a batch of Espresso beans I roasted). Is the coffee shop aroma just an accumulation of un-swept grounds built up over time or is there something I could do to capture the magic at home (even if that was sourcing cheap beans which I could roast just for the smell - and then use for unwanted guests)?


#2

At first I used to think this came from a high charge spike in the beginning but now I think this coffee cream aroma comes from a well rounded profile, and when I say rounded I mean round-ed, Though you will also have to probably roast darker but not more developed as this is a tricky thing and I do not have the time at the moment to explain it.

Heres a rounded profile I’m talking a about.
‘Urra/Uai .6’ freshly roasted by @deven.patel411 , here’s the recipe
https://share.ikawa.support/profile_home/?CAESEO3P0s2vJU3zkEampfj+j2oaC1VycmEvVWFpIC42IgUIABD0AyIGCLsHEMUKIgYI8g0QwA4iBgjgFRCvESIGCKQeEOoSIgYI2SYQwRMiBgioLRDlEyoFCAAQzAEqBgiQEBC2ASoGCKgtEKcBMAE6BgjJOhC/AUImChwzdEpyTXBnYUJCV2NvN3haQ3VCZGpKb1BIRnAyEgAaACIAKAA=


#3

So you roast coffee to make your home smell nice? Quite a expansive way! :slight_smile:

Jokes beside…I remember that I had the same thoughts after my first roast and was kind of dissapointed simply as I expected different. However usually after the beans rest a few days the nice smell develops. I did invest thought in fellows coffee jars and it seeks to keep indeed the aroma inside.
Also the Ikawa amount you roast is small and usually you do not keep on doing whole day. This is not to compare with continious roasting and big amounts like in a roastery I guess.
The round curve is though interesting to test and to smell the difference


#4

Thank you for this. I’ll give it a try.


#5

Fresh roasted coffee does not have a particularly plesant fragrance. lighter roasts tends to leave a green smell in the room, and darker leaves a more burnt smell.
When you sniff your beans just after roasting, they’ll likely just smell baked, a bit like bread.
Pleasent fragrances usually come after a few days or longer after the beans have had a chance to de-gas.
A good coffee bean seller don’t sell day fresh beans. The pleasantness really begins when you grind the beans (admittedly there may be some refined notes when you open degassed whole beans), which really shouldn’t be done at the bean shop, but many people don’t own a grinder at home.


#6

I just started using the Ikawa. Good to know bc my place reeks like a popcorn smell. I’ll give it a day or two to see how the beans smell afterwards.


#7

Somethings I forgot to mention earlier that also helps with that “coffee shop” like aroma.

Yea like mentioned by @nhsnielsen, time for degassing in the airscape (at least 10 days but prob more like 20) is necessary they aren’t going to smell like that right after roasting, I would say you have to roast them till they smell a little like char and the resting helps settle that char note down, given that you don’t bake them out. This also means that you need to loose more moisture getting the beans at least to 15% but I think more like 16-18% is better, though I have not roasted much like a Starbucks style. But hopefully you are doing this with mid-tier beans and not SO microlots.